Lady Bios

 
  • Edna Ferber [united-states ]

    Edna FerberEdna Ferber ( 1885-1968) was an American novelist, short story writer and playwright. Her novels were especially popular and included the Pulitzer Prize-winning So Big (1924), Show Boat (1926; made into the celebrated 1927 musical), Cimarron (1929; made into the 1931 film which won the Academy Award for Best Picture) and Giant (1952; made into the 1956 Hollywood movie) Edna never married and had no children.
  • Elaine Stritch [united-states ]

    Elaine Stritch Elaine Stritch (1925 – 2014) was an American actress and singer, best known for her work on Broadway. She appeared in numerous stage plays and musicals, feature films and many television programs. Elaine was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1995. Elaine won an Emmy Award in 1993 for her guest role on Law & Order and another in 2004 for the television documentary of her one woman show. From 2007 to 2012, she had a recurring role  on NBC's 30 Rock, a role that won her a third Emmy in 2007. Elaine performed a cabaret act in New York City at the Cafe Carlyle in the Carlyle Hotel, from 2005 until she left New York in 2013. Elaine Stritch died in her sleep at her home in Birmingham, Michigan, in 2014. She was 89 years old.  
  • Eleanor Blair [united-states ]

    Eleanor Blair Eleanor Blair searches for beauty in the natural world and in everyday things. She  works primarily in oil, from life and from photographs. Eleanor  graduated from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City in 1969. She moved to Gainesville in 1971 and has been painting Central Florida scenes since that time. Eleanor Blair  is a well-known member of the art community in Gainesville; exhibiting her work in local art festivals, performing on stage with the Gainesville Chamber Orchestra  and working in her studio/gallery downtown.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt [united-states ]

    Eleanor Roosevelt Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884 –1962) was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office. President.  Eleanor was  called the “First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rights achievements. Eleanor had an unhappy childhood, suffering the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age. Eleanor became an important connection  to the African-American population during the segregation era. Despite the President’s desire to placate Southern sentiment, Eleanor was vocal in her support of the African-American civil rights movement. She concluded that New Deal programs were discriminating against African-Americans, who received a disproportionately small share of relief moneys. Eleanor became one of the only voices in the Roosevelt White House insisting that benefits be equally extended to Americans of all races. Eleanor also broke with precedent by inviting hundreds of African American guests to the White House. When the black singer Marian Anderson was denied the use of Washington’s Constitution Hall in 1939 by the Daughters of the American Revolution, Eleanor resigned from the group in protest and helped arrange another concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
  • Elena Stasik [united-states ]

    Elena Stasik From the Elena Stasik website: I am a coach, yoga teacher, sistership circle facilitator, a mother and a spiritual seeker. I am here to provide you with powerful tools, support, inspiration, motivation and guidance, to share all that I’ve learned on my journey to self discovery, finding deeper joy, fulfillment and inner peace in my life. My transformational journey started in 2003 when I discovered yoga and meditation. It made me realize that I had to start within, that I had to dig deep to find my truth and who I am. It was a whole new world for me discovering myself from within. I began reading inspirational literature, attending workshops, seminars, teacher trainings, I became a yoga teacher back in 2004 and I have been teaching since, continuously growing, peeling away all that is not me but what I’ve picked up along the way. I have gained tremendous wisdom from my experiences and training. The more I learned and discovered myself, the more I was called to share it all with other women.
  • Elizabeth 1 [europe ]

    elizabeth 1Elizabeth I  of England (1533 – 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, the childless Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two and a half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey. During Mary's reign, Elizabeth was imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels. Elizabeth's reign is known as the Elizabethan  era. The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. Elizabeth is acknowledged as a charismatic performer and a dogged survivor in an era when government was ramshackle and limited, and when monarchs in neighbouring countries faced internal problems that jeopardized their thrones. Such was the case with Elizabeth's rival, Mary, Queen of Scots, whom she imprisoned in 1568 and had executed in 1587.  
  • Elizabeth Kübler-Ross [united-states ]

    Elizabeth Kubler Elizabeth Kübler-Ross (one of triplets) (1926 - 2004) was a Swiss-American psychiatrist, a pioneer in near-death studies and the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying (1969), where she first discussed her theory of the five stages of grief. She became interested in out-of-body experiences, mediumship, spiritualism, and other ways of attempting to contact the dead. She was a 2007 inductee into the American National Women's Hall of Fame. She was the recipient of twenty honorary degrees and by July 1982 had taught, in her estimation, 125,000 students in death and dying courses in colleges, seminaries, medical schools, hospitals, and social-work institutions. Her father did not want her to study medicine, but she persisted. In 1958 she married a fellow medical student from America and moved to the United States. Becoming pregnant disqualified her from a residency in pediatrics, so she took one in psychiatry.  In 1985 she attempted to build a hospice for children and infants infected with HIV  in Virginia, but local residents feared the possibility of infection and blocked the necessary re-zoning. In 1994, she lost her house and possessions to an arson fire that is suspected to have been set by opponents of her AIDS work. Elizabeth conducted many workshops on AIDS in different parts of the world.  
  • Elizabeth Padillo Olesen [united-states ]

    Poet of Christian spirituality as response to personal crises in life, woes and struggles of women, natural calamities, violence and terror. She expresses poetic sensitivity to events in our history that reflect conflicts in culture, religion and ideologies. Elizabeth writes from the eyes of faith, attempting to read the signs of our time in the light of the source of love and life that has called us to be responsible stewards as we commit ourselves to acts of love, compassion, peace and justice. The poems were written during her time as a student, teacher, pastor, ecumenical and community worker in the Philippines, as a missionary in Nepal, teacher, wife, mother, and as a cultural worker in Denmark, stretching a period of more than twenty years. She writes to those who seek life, to those who despair, and to those who want to be inspired. in celebrating beauty and human creativity.  Elizabeth has illustrated some poems with her own paintings.
  • Ellen Degeneres [united-states ]

    Ellen Degeneres Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958) is an American comedian, television host, actress, writer, and television producer.  She was the star in the popular sitcom Ellen from 1994 to 1998, and has hosted her syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show since 2003. Ellen DeGeneres is a vegan who calls herself a "big animal lover" and co-ordinates a vegan outreach website titled 'Going Vegan with Ellen' and promotes meatless Mondays.  In 2009, PETA named her their "Woman of the Year. In April 2013, she donated $25,000 to stop Ag-Gag anti-whistleblower legislation in Tennessee, which would prohibit undercover investigators from recording footage of animal abuse on farms. DeGeneres served as campaign ambassador to Farm Sanctuary's Adopt-A-Turkey Project in 2010, asking people to start "a new tradition by adopting a turkey instead of eating one" at Thanksgiving. In  2011, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton named her a Special envoy for Global AIDS Awareness.  
  • Ellen Page [canada ]

    Ellen Page Ellen Page born 1987 in Halifax, NB is a Canadian actress who started her career in Canada with roles in the television shows Pit Pony, Trailer Park Boys, and ReGenesis. Page ventured into films, winning attention after starring in the 2005 drama Hard Candy, before her breakthrough role as Juno (2007). Ellen has had many roles. Page has won more than 25 awards, and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress, a Golden Globe Award, and a BAFTA for Juno. In 2008, Page was one of 30 celebrities who participated in an online ad series for U.S. Campaign for Burma, calling for an end to the military dictatorship in Burma. She describes herself as a pro-choice feminist. She attended Buddhist school in her youth and practiced meditation and yoga. She practices a vegan lifestyle, and PETA named her one of the Sexiest Vegetarians of 2014. On February 14, 2014, Page came out as gay in a speech at the Human Rights Campaign's "Time to Thrive" conference.
  • Elsie de Wolfe [united-states ]

    Elsie de WolfeElsie de Wolfe (1859-1950) was an American actress, interior decorator and author of the influential 1913 book The House in Good Taste. She was a prominent figure in New York, Paris, and London society. Elsie  was certainly the most famous name in the field of interior design until the 1930s. Her first official commission was The Colony Club in New York. Among Elsie's distinguished clients were Amy Vanderbilt, Anne Morgan, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Henry and Adelaide Clay Frick. She transformed the interiors of wealthy homes from dark wood, heavily curtained palaces into light, intimate spaces featuring fresh colors and a reliance on 18th-century French furniture and accessories. Elsie's 1926 marriage to diplomat Sir Charles Mendl was page one news in the New York Times. The marriage was platonic and one of convenience. The pair appeared to have married primarily for social amenities, entertaining together, but keeping separate residences. In 1935, when de Wolfe published her autobiography, she didn't even mention her husband in it. Learn more here.
  • Emily Carr [canada ]

    Emily Carr

    Emily Carr (December 13, 1871 – March 2, 1945) was a Canadian artist and writer heavily inspired by the Indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. Emily was one of the first painters in Canada to adopt a modernist and post-impressionist painting style.

    Emily Carr did not receive widespread recognition for her work until later in her life. As she matured, the subject matter of her painting shifted from aboriginal themes to landscapes, and in particular, forest scenes. As a writer, Carr was one of the earliest chroniclers of life in British Columbia.

     
  • Emma Thompson [europe ]

    Emma Thompson Emma Thompson (born 1959) is a British actress, comedian, screenwriter and author. Thompson won multiple acting awards, including an Academy Award and a BAFTA Award for Best Actress for her work. In 1977, she began studying for an English degree at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. During this time, Emma had a “seminal moment” that turned her to feminism and inspired her to take up performing. She had discovered the book The Madwoman in the Attic, “which is about Victorian female writers and the disguises they took on in order to express what they wanted to express. This completely changed her lif. “I’m an atheist; I suppose you can call me a sort of libertarian anarchist. I regard religion with fear and suspicion. It’s not enough to say that I don’t believe in God. I actually regard the system as distressing: I am offended by some of the things said in the Bible and the Qur’an and I refute them.” Despite this, she has said that “The guiding moral principles, the ethical principles, much of the philosophy of the Christian tradition, if properly applied, is very good”. Emma is outspoken on the environment and human rights, and has authored two books.
  • Erinn McMurtrie [united-states ]

    Erinn McMurtrie Erinn McMurtrie website:
    Are you ready to finally experience FREEDOM around your relationship with food? What would it be like to create a Healthy that's fun, flexible and empowering?
    Once I began to Eat Like a Goddess, I started showing up like a Goddess everywhere else in my life. Read more about my personal story here. Learn about:-Finding blissful joy in eating yummy food, while releasing emotional eating patterns that leave you feeling like a slave to your relationship with food.-Exploring what foods work best for your unique body and learn about how to use nutrients to support your energy, digestion and overall physical comfort and prosperity. -Encourage you to nurture your health with a holistic perspective that includes cultivating joy, connecting with others, spirituality, physical activity, stress management, sacred femininity and living an authentically aligned life.
  • Etta Palm D’Aelders [europe ]

    Etta Lubina Johanna Palm d'Aelders (1743 – 1799) received a good education, which was remarkable for a girl in her age in a non-aristocratic family. Her marriage was not happy and her husband disappeared to the East Indies. Later, through all her connections of high circles  and her lovers she ended up in Paris living near the Palais Royal and was recruited for the French secret service.  Her missions allowed her to move up into the political life where she became a feminist who was outspoken during the French Revolution. This lead to her giving an address called the Discourse on the Injustice of the Laws in Favour of Men, at the Expense of Women to the French National Convention on 30 December 1790. In 1795 the French revolutionary armies invaded the Netherlands and Etta became suspect Etta was put under arrest in the fortress of Woerden together with her old spymaster Van de Spiegel. She was released at the end of 1798, but her health had suffered so much that she died the following March. Like many female activists, Etta  did not explicitly articulate a program for equal political rights for women, though that would no doubt have been her ultimate aim. Instead she worked to bring about a change in morals and customs that would in turn foster a more egalitarian atmosphere for women. She gave this address at a meeting of the Confederation of the Friends of Truth, the first political club to admit women as full members.      
  • Etty Hillesum [europe ]

    Etty Hillesum (Esther) Etty Hillesum (15 January 1914 – 30 November 1943) was a Jewish woman whose letters and diaries, kept between 1941 and 1943, describe life in Amsterdam during the German occupation. In the diaries, one can clearly see how the deepening anti-Jewish measures affected Etty Hillesum’s life. She applied  for a position with the Jewish Council and  received an appointment to the office on the Lijnbaansgracht (later the Oude Schans) on 15 July 1942. She later transferred to the department of “Social Welfare for People in Transit” at Westerbork on 30 July 1942. Before her final departure for Westerbork, Etty gave her Amsterdam diaries to Maria Tuinzing. Etty asked her to pass them along to the writer Klaas Smelik with the request that they be published if she did not return. In 1947, Maria Tuinzig turned over the exercise books and a bundle of letters to him. His daughter Johanna (Jopie) Smelik then typed out sections of the diaries, but Klaas Smelik’s attempts to have the diaries published in the 1950s proved fruitless. It wasn’t until 1981 that  Het verstoorde leven  was published in Dutch and  in 1999 that it was  translated into English ( An Interrupted Life) was republished. Learn more of Etty Hillesum here.